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Wednesday, April 22, 2020 | History

5 edition of Popular attitudes toward birth control in pre-industrial France and England found in the catalog.

Popular attitudes toward birth control in pre-industrial France and England

Orest A. Ranum

Popular attitudes toward birth control in pre-industrial France and England

  • 98 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Harper & Row in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • France,
  • Great Britain
    • Subjects:
    • Birth control -- France -- History.,
    • Birth control -- Great Britain -- History.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementedited by Orest and Patricia Ranum.
      SeriesBasic conditions of life, Harper torchbooks, TB 1696
      ContributionsRanum, Patricia M., joint comp.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHQ766.5.F7 R35 1972
      The Physical Object
      Pagination129 p.
      Number of Pages129
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5298212M
      ISBN 100061316962
      LC Control Number72078548

      • Birth control • Vaccination • Sexual mores For an interesting example of how attitudes toward long hair changed over time, (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, ); O. Ranum and P. Ranum, eds., Popular Attitudes toward Birth Control in Pre-industrial France and England.


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Popular attitudes toward birth control in pre-industrial France and England by Orest A. Ranum Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: Collected Work History: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Ranum, Orest A. Popular attitudes toward birth control in pre-industrial France and England.

Popular attitudes toward birth control in pre-industrial France and England On the origins of contraception in FranceRiquet, M. Christianity and populationGautier, E. and Henry, L. The population of Crulai, a Norman parishWrigley, E.

Family limitation in pre-industrial EnglandAries, P. An interpretation to be used for a. Popular attitudes toward birth control in pre-industrial France and England, on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Popular attitudes toward birth control in pre-industrial France and EnglandManufacturer: Harper & Row. Popular Attitudes Toward Birth Control in Pre-Industrial France and England. With Patricia Ranum. New York, Biology of Man in History.

With Robert Forster. Baltimore, National Consciousness, History, and Culture in Early Modern Europe. Baltimore, Rural Society in France.

With Robert Forster. Baltimore, 1. Author(s): Ranum,Orest; Ranum,Patricia Title(s): Popular attitudes toward birth control in pre-industrial France and England, edited by Orest and Patricia Ranum. Country of Publication: United States Publisher: New York, Harper & Row [c] Description: p.

More editions of Popular attitudes toward birth control in pre-industrial France and England, (Basic conditions of life): Popular attitudes toward birth control in pre-industrial France and England, (Basic conditions of life): ISBN () Softcover, Harper & Row, I received Popular Attitudes toward Birth Control in Pre-Industrial France and England instead of Karen’s Copycat, a book geared towards young children, so I’m not happy about getting a book about birth control.

I give one star only because I have by: 1. The essays included in this book explore the relationships between medicine and the society and time in which it was practiced Popular attitudes toward birth control in pre-industrial France and England by Orest A Ranum (Book).

Western Attitudes toward Death From the Middle Ages to the Present (The Johns Hopkins Symposia in Comparative History) by Professor Philippe Ariès, Professor Philippe Aria"S, Professor Patricia Ranum, Philippe.

Aries, Professor Philippe Ariã¨S, Patricia M. Ranum, Philippe Ari S, Phillipe Aries Hardcover, Pages, Published by The Johns Hopkins University Press ISBN 1. The nuclear family was the most common in pre-industrial Europe.

On average, the age at marriage was higher prior toespecially for the lower classes. Some areas required legal permission or approval of the local lord or landowner for marriage.

Many men and women never married. Children. His views gained favor in England and America throughout the second half of the eighteenth century. By physicians rarely argued against giving infants colostrum.

The result was a rather sudden cultural shift in attitudes toward maternal breastfeeding, and therefore in attitudes toward the relationship among mothers, fathers, and children. The history of childhood has been a topic of interest in social history since the highly influential book Centuries of Childhood, published by French historian Philippe Ariès in He argued "childhood" as a concept was created by modern ès studied paintings, gravestones, furniture, and school records.

He found before the 17th-century, children were represented as mini-adults. The Industrial Revolution, now also known as the First Industrial Revolution, was the transition to new manufacturing processes in Europe and the United States, in the period from about to sometime between and This transition included going from hand production methods to machines, new chemical manufacturing and iron production processes, the increasing use of steam power and.

There are several other “methods” that were absorbed as culturally “normal”: It was common for poor and middle class Irish in the 19th century to marry relatively late (late 20s-early 40s).

Effectively this shortened the fertile years a woman had. During the first Industrial Revolution, Britain experienced massive changes including scientific discoveries, expanding gross national product, new technologies, and architectural the same time, the population changed—it increased and became more urbanized, healthy, and educated.

This nation was forever transformed for the better. The limited birth control literature was supplemented by the appearance of Dr. Charles Knowlton's tract, The Fruits of Philosophy, or, The Private Companion of Young Married People (). Also, Noyes's success with coitus reservatus at Oneida gave that method of control some notoriety.

Pre-Industrial, agrarian societies have high birth rates because of the economic value of children and the absence of birth control. Death rates are also high because of low living standards and limited medical technology. Disease from outbreaks of disease cancel out.

Revolution and Rebellion in the Early Modern World: Population Change and State Breakdown in England, France, Turkey, and China,; 25th Anniversary Edition by Jack A.

Goldstone. What can the great crises of the past teach us about contemporary revolutions. They Prefer Withdrawal: The Choice of Birth Control in Britain, Article in Journal of Interdisciplinary History 34(2) October with 27 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Birth control methods were primitive and undependable. Coitus interruptus was the most common form of birth control. New patterns of marriage and illegitimacy 1. Between about and the number of illegitimate births soared--in some places from 2 to 25 percent of all births. Topics included are biological and mythological foundations of gender concepts, attitudes toward the body and sex in pre-Christian and Christian culture, sin and ecclesiastical legislation on sex and marriage, family life and education, the individual and kinship, heresy and charismatic religion, and the impact of social-economic development on.

[Show full abstract] between and form the basis for new information about who actually bought and borrowed different kinds of fiction in 18th-century provincial England. This book thus Author: Martin Powers.

Public HealthConcepts and practices [1]The Greco-Roman world [2]The Middle Ages [3]The modern era [4]Public health and sanitary reform [5]Development of the health sciences [6]The twentieth century—international trends [7]BIBLIOGRAPHY [8]As far back.

The eighteenth century has been described as “the age of” a number of things: reason, change, enlightenment, and sensibility, to name but a few. Germans described the eighteenth century as a pedagogical age, and this moniker seems particularly apt in the context of both attitudes toward children and the experience of childhood.

Rilke's attitudes toward Prague, where he was born René Karl Wilhelm Johann Josef Maria Rilke on 4 Decemberwere mixed, as were those toward his parents.

His father, Josef, was a former warrant officer in the Austrian army who at the time of Rilke's birth was a railroad official—a job perhaps owed to the influence of Josef's well-to-do. Marc Flandreau The Glitter of Gold: France, Bimetallism, and the Emergence of the International Gold Standard, New York: Oxford University Press, xxiii + pp.

$ (cloth), ISBN: Reviewed for by Pierre Sicsic, Bank of France. This is a gem of a book. The Industrial Revolution is an era that began in England at the end of the 18th century, and has yet to end.

We can distinguish three phases of the Industrial Revolution in modern world history, based on when various countries and regions began to go through the process and what key technologies and industries stood out in the most developed. Kaestle, CF Stone, L “The Scylla of brutal ignorance and the Charybdis of a literary education”: Elite attitudes toward mass education in early industrial England and America School and society Baltimore Johns Hopkins University Press Google ScholarCited by: William Schneider's study provides a fascinating account of attempts to apply new discoveries in biology and medicine toward the improvement in the inherited biological quality of the population through such measures as birth control, premarital examinations, sterilization, and immigration restriction.

Official site of The Week Magazine, offering commentary and analysis of the day's breaking news and current events as well as arts, entertainment, Author: The Week Staff.

Sleep We Have Lost: Pre-industrial Slumber in the British Isles. Daniel Roche has implored, "Let us dream of a social history of sleep." A Histoly of Evelyday Things: The Birth of Consumption in France,Brian Pearce, trans.

(Cambridge, ), Charles Carlton, "The Dream Life of Archbishop Laud," Histoly Today Introduction This special report is intended to assist the Japanese audience in more fully understanding the present policies of the United States under the administration of President George explains the thinking behind America’s military adventure in the Persian Gulf and its current attitudes toward the Middle East region.

In so doing, we provide a glimpse into the most powerful. The Black Death was the largest demographic disaster in European history. From its arrival in Italy in late through its clockwise movement across the continent to its petering out in the Russian hinterlands inthe magna pestilencia (great pestilence) killed between seventeen and.

This change has been seen by some as a means of countering the rising birth control movement, especially in France,8 with its declining Catholic population.

In Italy, during the years tothe papal states shrank from almost one-third of the country to what is now Vatican City. Between 30 and 40% of the youth in pre-industrial England were in service, the largest single occupational group until the 20 th century.

49 The practice of taking in servants went beyond simply providing for one’s needs by bringing in outsiders. The onset of England and Wales’, indeed much of Europe’s, fertility transition has been dated by demographers to somewhere in the s (Figure 1) or a bit later (Chesnais,table ).The decline in the total fertility rate (TFR) that we see in the upper panel of Figure 1 was accompanied by a decline in net fertility (lower panel).).

Fertility did decline earlier in the nineteenth Cited by: 6. India, one of the chief beneficiaries of U.S. outsourcing, is also one of the few countries in which popular attitudes toward America have remained strongly positive.” Author asked grandfather, at the age of 93, why getting a U.S.

citizenship was so important to me, “Because America has given me so much>”. Our experiences of dying have been shaped by ancient ideas about death and social responsibility at the end of life.

From Stone Age ideas about dying as otherworld journey to the contemporary Cosmopolitan Age of dying in nursing homes, Allan Kellehear takes the reader on a 2 million year journey of discovery that covers the major challenges we will all eventually face: anticipating, preparing Cited by: Sudden frights Medical and popular traditions of nerves could weaken the nerves and leave one vulnerable to neurasthenia.

The term 'railway fright' was used to describe how a ride on a train could practically dissolve a human nervous system in an by: One way of looking at cultural attitudes to time is in terms of time orientation, a cultural or national preference toward past, present, or future thinking.

The time orientation of a culture affects how it values time, and the extent to which it believes it can control time. For example, America is often considered to be future-orientated, as. Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more.Includes the full range of family concepts from the one-parent to the extended family and includes studies on the life course of the family.

Studies on attitudes toward family size are coded under F Attitudes toward Fertility and Fertility Control. Al-Haj, Majid.These policies include church-state separation, attitudes toward multi-culturalism, and immigration policies favoring the dominant ethnic groups.

This double standard is fairly pervasive.(16) A principal theme of CofC is that Jewish organizations played a decisive role in opposing the idea that the United States ought to be a European nation.